Hearing Health Blog

How to Clean and Take Care of your Ears

Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers, Made for iPhone hearing aids, invisible hearing aids, starkey hearing technology, hearing test, hearing evaluation, hearing loss, starkey hearing foundation, deaf, Chicago

When it comes to taking care of our bodies we know how important it is to exercise regularly, see the dentist twice a year, get eight hours of sleep a night and eat a well-balanced diet. But what about taking care of our ears? In order to better understand the ear and how to properly care for it, here are some helpful tips and information to help guide you to better ear care!

Earwax: the truth

First, I want to debunk a myth. Many people think earwax, the yellow waxy substance that is produced in the ear canal, is a bad thing or gross. This is FALSE! Earwax actually plays a number of very important roles: it protects the ear canal skin, assists in cleaning and lubrication and provides protection from bacteria, fungi, insects and water. 

How to clean your ears

The ear is actually self-cleaning and for most people ear canals do not need to be cleaned. The best thing you can do for your ears is to not put anything in them that is smaller than your elbow. Wax is not formed in the deep part of the ear canal, but rather the outer part of the canal near the external opening. If left alone, old earwax naturally migrates out of the ear as a result of jaw movement. Inserting Q-tips, sharp or pointed objects into the ear will only push wax further into the canal and may even cause trauma to the canal wall or the eardrum. So let nature run its course and simply use a washcloth or tissue to wipe the outer ear after you bathe or shower.

Wax impaction

Earwax becomes a concern when an impaction or a complete blockage of the ear canal occurs. The symptoms of an impaction may include any of the following:

  • A plugged-up sensation or feeling of fullness in the ear
  • Earache
  • Changings in hearing sensitivity or hearing impairment
  • Ringing in the ear
  • Itching, odor or discharge
  • Coughing

If you experience any of these symptoms, first see your doctor; do not assume earwax is the culprit. If earwax is the cause, your doctor or a trained hearing healthcare provider can remove it.

Preventing wax impaction

If you know your ears produce a lot of earwax, and you have some wax build-up, the following ways may safely prevent a complete impaction from occurring:

  • Use wax softening agents: once a week place a few drops of mineral oil, baby oil or commercial ear drops (ex. Debrox, Murine) into the ear canal. This will help soften the earwax and allow it to come out more easily
  • Irrigate the ear: the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery cites irrigation or syringing of the ear as a means to safely clean the ears and help with earwax blockages and build-ups. At-home irrigation kits can be purchased at the drug store but it is very important to follow the directions when using these. For more of a preventative maintenance, a simple and convenient way to irrigate the ear is when you are in the shower. Tilt your head toward warm water, allowing the ear to fill up. Once filled, tip your head over and let the water and earwax drain out. Please note, using a wax-softening agent prior to irrigation may yield the best results. Caution: avoid irrigation if you have a perforated eardrum or a tube in the eardrum.

Another excellent preventative measure is to schedule an appointment for wax removal every 6-12 months with Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers, today!

Things you should NEVER do

There are a number of things you should never do to your ears.

  1. Don’t stick anything in your ear smaller than your elbow.
  2. No ear candling. Ear candling, also called ear coning or thermal-auricular therapy, is an alternative medicine practice claimed to improve general health and well being by lighting one end of a hollow candle and placing the other end in the ear canal. Research shows that this procedure has no proven benefit in the removal of earwax and that it can actually cause serious injury. Just steer clear of it! To learn more check out this article from the American Academy of Audiology.

Earwax and hearing aids

Hearing aids and earwax do not play well together. If you wear hearing aids, you know exactly what I am talking about. Earwax can clog the microphones or receivers of the hearing aid, which can impact performance and sound quality. It can reduce the effectiveness of the hearing aid by blocking sound and can even cause enough damage to warrant repair. Some users notice an increase in wax production when they begin wearing hearing aids. This is not uncommon.

Hearing aids not only block the normal migration of earwax out of the ear but can also stimulate glands in the ear canal to produce more wax. It is extremely important to properly clean and care for your hearing aids as instructed by your hearing healthcare professional. For some at-home tips,click here. If you actively engage in preventative earwax practices, like using wax-softening agents or performing irrigation, do them at night before bed after you have taken out your hearing aids. In the morning, make sure to wipe the outer ear with a towel or tissue to remove any wax that may have migrated out before putting in your hearing aids

Swimmer’s Ear

Have you ever had water trapped in your ears after swimming? Most of us have! The natural reaction to dislodge the water is to tilt the head to the side and shake it rigorously or to tug downward on the earlobe while opening and closing the jaw. Though the head shaking and opening/closing of the jaw may go on for some time, it is often successful as evidenced by hearing a pop and feeling the water drain from the ear. However, sometimes the water cannot be freed, and due to the bacterial and fungal organisms in the water, an outer ear infection known as Swimmer’s Ear can occur. The most common signs and symptoms of an infection include itching inside the ear, pain that gets worse when you tug on the earlobe and a plugged-up sensation or feeling of fullness. If you experience any of these symptoms you should see your doctor immediately to obtain proper treatment.

A great way to prevent water from getting trapped in the ear is to make your own eardrops at home using a mixture of half rubbing alcohol and half vinegar. The American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery supports the use of this preventative approach and states that this mixture will help evaporate excess water and keep the ears dry. When using the eardrops please follow these instructions:

  1. Tilt your head and place five to six drops of the mixture into the ear.
  2. Pull downward on your earlobe and open and close your jaw; this will help the drops to move further the ear canal.
  3. Hold your head in the tilted position for at least 30 seconds.
  4. Turn your head over and allow the drops to pour out of the ear. Make sure to have a towel or tissue on hand.
  5. Check to see if the ear is still plugged. If so, repeat these steps.

CAUTION: Do not use ear drops if you have a perforated eardrum or a tube in the eardrum.

If you try these steps several times and the water will not come out, see your doctor or hearing professional. Do not allow days to go by without removing water from your ears or you could get an infection.

If water gets trapped in your ear often or you are prone to getting ear infections, consider investing in some custom floatable swim plugs. These protective plugs are specifically fit to your ear to create a watertight seal in the ear canal to keep out water and moisture. Plus, they are available in many fun colors allowing you to not only protect your ears but look good doing it! Swim plugs can be obtained from any hearing healthcare professional.

Unlike the rest of our bodies, the ear is actually pretty easy to maintain and keep in a healthy state. Just keep these tips in mind and you will be in good (ear) shape!


Reversing the “Hearing Aid Effect”

Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers, Made for iPhone hearing aids, invisible hearing aids, starkey hearing technology, hearing test, hearing evaluation, hearing loss, starkey hearing foundation, deaf, ChicagoTrends have to start somewhere. In fashion, it’s on the runways of New York City or Paris. For music, content that spreads on social media makes songs and artists popular. And for sports, it’s TV and branding that makes certain athletes more popular than others, more “relatable” in a way. But what about hearing aids?

Unlike the commodities and persons above, the trends involving hearing aids aren’t specific to a brand or product. They are based on emotion, stigma and perception. The original hearing aid trend is referred to as the “hearing aid effect.”

The “hearing aid effect”
Years ago, wearing hearing aids made a statement, usually one the wearer didn’t want to make. Hearing aids of the 70s, 80s and early 90s were large, bulky, uncomfortable, hard to control, exhibited a whistling feedback and lent more embarrassment than assistance to the user. The negative term “the hearing aid effect” was born, associating hearing loss with the old or incapable.

Individuals viewed people with hearing aids as being less intelligent, less capable and essentially not “normal.” Early studies showed that children found other children with hearing aids less intelligent and less attractive (Dengerink & Porter, 1984; Silverman & Klees, 1989). A study with college students by Blood and Danaher in 1977 found that a series of photographs featuring boys with hearing aids were rated lower for intelligence, achievement, personality and appearance than the photographs featuring boys without hearing aids.

What’s changed?
Today’s culture is all about modern technology, sleek smartphones and following social trends started by celebrities and political figures. It is now commonplace to see ears adorned with technology. No one bats an eye or stops to decipher if someone is wearing an earbud for an MP3 player or a hearing aid. Both are accepted, even commonplace. Teenagers connect to music and movies using headphones. Business professionals connect to meetings using personalized audio equipment. Unlike the years before, we are now capable of providing necessary technology and satisfying the cosmetic desires of the public.

Hearing aids are now small, discreet and comfortable. Some are completely undetectable. More effective feedback management, wireless technology and the ability to function with smartphone devices to stream calls and media has led to overall improved lifestyle performance, which in turn calls less attention to someone’s hearing loss. Modern day hearing aids don’t denote lesser intelligence or capability. According to a 2014 study by Erik Rauterkus and Catherine Palmer, published as “The hearing aid effect in 2013” in the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, hearing aids now actually demand increased levels of respect.

It isn’t only the sleeker designs and highly advanced technology that has contributed to this positive view. Researchers speculate that a combination of factors has positively contributed to the reduction in the “hearing aid effect.” Improvements in hearing aid design and performance as well as decreased size could all be factors. But there are three other factors that have similarly led to a positive outlook on hearing aids.

Unintentional camouflaging from the music, communications and fitness industries
The music and communications industries indirectly made hearing aids “OK” with the creation of ear-level devices such as headphones and earbuds for listening to music and Bluetooth headsets that allow people to take calls with no hands. The fitness world has made hearing aids more acceptable with headphones for running or biking. Bluetooth and listening devices are so commonplace today that no one thinks about them. They denote popularity, social commonalities, activity and cultural involvement. Many of these devices look similar to some hearing aids, making them more accepted by society.

Celebrities have hearing loss, too?
The awareness of prominent public figures and known celebrities with hearing loss has done a lot to reduce the stigma. Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton both were open about their hearing loss and use of Starkey Hearing Technologies’ hearing aids. Musicians such as Pete Townsend and Neil Young have likewise become open about discussing their hearing loss and use of hearing aids. NFL star Derrick Coleman put hearing aids on the map for athletes when he was fitted with the Made for iPhone hearing aids and became an advocate for the Starkey Hearing Foundation.

The increasing involvement of big name figures and companies has led to unquestioning social acceptance. Public figures are opening the floor for the discussion on hearing loss, and many have become social advocates for raising awareness and helping to battle hearing loss by working with the Starkey Hearing Foundation. Musical superstars such as Matt Nathanson, along with renowned professional athletes from the NFL and NHL, Derrick Coleman and David Backes, are helping to raise awareness by participating in international mission trips year-round.

Apple and the iPhone Revolution
With iPhone popularity has come the need for Made For iPhone® (MFi) technology. Audibel released its Starkey Hearing Technology powered A3i product late in 2014. Because the A3i Made for iPhone is useable with iPhone and select Android™ products, but now they’ve released the A4i product and it’s quickly making hearing aids cool.

Hearing aids aren’t age-based, intelligence-based or for a certain segment of the population. They are sleek, smart, cool and for anyone and everyone with hearing loss, at any age and any time.

Check out our incredible products at www.chicagolandhearing.com to learn more about hearing aids today.


Warning Signs of Hearing Loss

WarningSignBlog_Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers_Starkey Hearing Technology_Audible_Chicago_Hearing Loss_Made for Iphone_Audiologist

Hearing loss is commonly referred to as an invisible health condition and early signs of hearing loss are often overlooked. Unlike other medical conditions, you can’t physically see the signs of hearing loss. Because the changes often occur gradually, it is quite common for individuals with hearing loss to find ways to cope and grow accustomed to reduced hearing acuity.

Family and friends are often the first to notice. In an article on CNN.com, audiologist Virginia Ramachandran explained, “People don’t always perceive that they need hearing aids, because hearing loss comes on gradually. Usually they are the last person to know. “

Recognizing Hearing Loss

The following questions can help identify common warning signs of hearing loss:

  • Do you have difficulty following conversations?
  • Do you ask others to repeat themselves?
  • Do you complain that people mumble or speak too fast?
  • It is difficult for you to hear and understand women and children?
  • Do you have ringing in your ears?
  • Do you have a favorite ear?
  • Do you have trouble hearing on the telephone?
  • Do you find yourself turning up the volume of your television?
  • Do others complain that you keep the volume of your television too loud?
  • Do you avoid noisy places?
  • Do you ever feel embarrassed about misunderstanding what others say to you?
  • Do you feel tired after listening in challenging environments?

 

Understanding Hearing Loss
Individuals with hearing loss have difficulty following conversations and understanding the voices of women and children. Most complain that people mumble or talk too fast. Hearing loss is often accompanied by tinnitus. A buildup of earwax, medication, exposure to loud sounds and hearing loss can all cause ringing in the ears, or tinnitus. The ringing might be constant or occasional, but it is often the first sign of hearing loss. Individuals with hearing loss may prefer one ear, reporting that they have a “good ear.” They may ask others to stand close to the better ear or speak directly into that ear. Those with hearing loss may even avoid challenging listening situations including conversations over the phone and noisy environments.

Treatment Options
If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed here, schedule a complete hearing evaluation with Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers today! Effective treatments are available for hearing loss! The most common way to address hearing loss is with hearing aids, but occasionally medication or surgery is needed. A hearing consultation with a professional is the best way to find out if you have hearing loss and what options are available if you do.

Take the next step to restore your hearing. Early detection has been proven to create better treatment outcomes.


Repairing Your Hearing Aid

 Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers, Made for iPhone hearing aids, invisible hearing aids, starkey hearing technology, hearing test, hearing evaluation, hearing loss, starkey hearing foundation, deaf, ChicagoJust like a phone or computer, hearing aids are sophisticated devices that can provide years of benefit when cared for properly.  Because of their everyday use, even with every precaution taken, they are susceptible to the elements along with other variables life may throw your way.  If your dog used your hearing aid as a chew toy, or your hearing aid has a simple malfunction, we’ve got you covered.

Here are a few simple reminders about caring for your hearing aids if you do run into a problem:

  • Never attempt to repair your hearing aids yourself.  While do-it-yourself projects around the house may save you money, do-it-yourself repairs usually cause more damage than good to your hearing technology. If you run into a situation where you need a repair, report the problem immediately to your local provider’s office.
  • Never wear your hearing instruments in the shower or while swimming.
  • If your hearing instruments do get wet, never try any “quick drying” methods such as microwaves, hair dryers, or ovens.  Consult with your provider if your instruments are inoperable due to moisture.
  • Always place hearing instruments in a safe place out of reach of pets or children.
  • If your hearing instruments sound distorted or unclear, they may be in need of repair and you should consult with your provider immediately.
  • Visit your provider at least twice a year for follow-up care and routine service.  Hearing loss is dynamic, we recommend that you having your hearing tested at least once a year to make sure you are receiving the maximum benefit from your hearing instruments.

If you experience issues with your hearing instruments during your warranty period, simply bring them to our office.  In many cases, we’re able to fix the issue and find an immediate solution which saves you time and money.

If your hearing aids are experiencing a more complex problem, we may need to send them to the repair lab.  Because hearing aids become such an essential part of your life, we understand that even going a day without them can be disappointing and frustrating. Because of this, we work with our hearing aid factory for repairs, who prioritizes and realizes the value of quick turn-around time as much as we do.

You may be wondering, how much is this going to cost to fix? The cost of repair depends on 3 factors of whether or not the hearing aid is still under warranty, the extent of damage to the hearing aid, and the cost of replacement parts for you hearing aid.

If you purchased your hearing aids from us and they are still under warranty, your hearing aid repair cost will most likely be very small, or maybe even free! Old, or out of warranty hearing aids may have a repair cost associated with them which can range depending on whether or not their broken parts can be repaired or replaced.

What happens if you didn’t purchase your hearing aids from us? We are committed to better hearing regardless of who you purchased your hearing aids from.  That being said, we provide repairs for major brands such as Audibel, Starkey, Phonak, GN Resound, Siemens, Miracle Ear, Costco Kirkland, Unitron, Oticon and many more.

Whether you have a pair of hearing aids sitting in your desk drawer that have been broken for quite some time, or a hearing aid that you think may not be working like it used to, contact Chicagoland Audibel Hearing Aid Centers today to help evaluate your options.  Your hearing is our number one priority!


Audibel is Now in Chicago!

We’re growing! Please come visit us in our TWO new Chicago locations! As a gift, we will give you a free pack of batteries if you mention this webpage. Conveniently located in the South Loop Roosevelt Commons right off Roosevelt Ave, and Lincoln Park near the North Ave Whole Foods – call us today to schedule your appointment!

 

Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers_Starkey Hearing Technology_Audibel_invisible hearing aids_made for iphone hearing aids_outside lincoln park officeLincoln Park:

Chicagoland Audibel Hearing Aid Center
939 W North Ave #750, Chicago, IL, US
(224) 325-4327

View Map Here >

 

Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers_Starkey Hearing Technology_Audibel_outsideSouth Loop:

Chicagoland Hearing Aid Center
150 West Roosevelt Road Suite b201 Chicago, IL 60605
(224) 325-4327

View Map Here >


Hearing Aid Myths Exposed!

Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers_Audibel_Starkey Hearing Technologies_Made for iphone hearing aids_invisible hearing aids_hearing blog myths and factsSometimes we love to mislead ourselves by believing what we want to believe or believing what others tell us to believe.  As Dr. H. Gustav Mueller once said, “You have to hear what you don’t want to hear to know what you don’t want to hear.”  For example, did you know that Thomas Edison didn’t invent the light bulb? Or did you know that cracking your knuckles really doesn’t lead to arthritis and that Thomas Crapper didn’t really invent the toilet?  There are a lot of examples of beliefs that we assume to be accurate, but it’s good every now and then to reevaluate what we think we know.

So how is your hearing knowledge? For many of us, it’s time to learn about some of the misconceptions about hearing loss and hearing aids.

MYTH: Hearing loss affects only “old people” and is merely a sign of aging.
TRUTH:
Actually it is the reverse of what most people think. 65% of people with hearing loss are younger than age 65. There are more than six million people in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 44 with hearing loss, and nearly one and a half million are school age. Hearing loss affects all age groups.

MYTH: If I had a hearing loss, my family doctor would have told me.
TRUTH: Only 13% of physicians routinely screen for hearing loss during a physical.

Since most people with hearing impairments hear well in quiet environments like a doctor’s office or examining room, it can be virtually impossible for your physician to recognize the extent of your problem. Without special training, and an understanding of the nature of hearing loss, it may be and can be very difficult for your doctor to even realize you have a hearing problem.

MYTH: My hearing loss is normal for my age.
TRUTH: Although it may be more common for loss at your age, it is not necessarily normal. But…isn’t it strange how we look at things? It happens to be “NORMAL” for overweight people to have high blood pressure. That doesn’t mean they should not receive treatment for the problem.

MYTH: I can wait until my hearing gets a lot worse before I have to do something about it.
TRUTH:
The longer a person waits to take care of their hearing, the less a hearing aid will do for them in the future. You may suffer auditory deprivation, a possible speech impediment, and remember- untreated hearing loss carries the same symptoms as Alzheimer’s disease.

MYTH: My hearing loss is not that big of a deal. I can live with it.
TRUTH: According to the 1990 National Center for Health Statistics, hearing loss is listed as the third leading cause of health problems in individuals over the age of 50. Arthritis and Hypertension are one and two.

MYTH: My hearing loss does not affect anyone accept me.
TRUTH: Your hearing affects everyone around you, including the ones who love you the most.

MYTH: Hearing aids are too expensive.
TRUTH: Some flat screen televisions sell for $8,000 or more, but this doesn’t make us say,  “All TVs are too expensive.” Just like TVs, hearing aids range in cost depending on features and performance. You can almost always  find hearing aids that fit your budget and lifestyle. The value of better hearing and a better life is almost always well worth the cost.

MYTH: You can save money buying hearing aids online.
TRUTH:
You wouldn’t purchase a pair of prescription glasses on the internet without consulting your eye doctor, because your glasses need to fit your vision loss. Buying hearing aids is the same.
Sure, visiting a hearing specialist may be more costly, but take into account what you get for the price.  You can be confident that you get the right hearing aid with the right fitting and settings, along with follow-up care, adjustments, cleanings, instructions, repair services, and more. It’s well worth it.

MYTH: I have friends that wear hearing aids and it does not seem to help them.

TRUTH: It is true that some people do not do as well as others with hearing aids. Just remember this:  we all do not get the same eyesight clarity with glasses, but we still do not want to be without them. The longer you wait to correct your hearing; the less you will get in return. You have one set of ears –  take care of them.

If you feel you have a hearing loss, you’re not alone. What keeps you alone is not finding the help that is needed to correct the situation. Help is just a phone call away. If you or someone you know is suffering from this debilitating problem, please contact us today for a hearing exam. Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers has 14 convenient locations across the Chicagoland area. We can guide you in the direction you need to go for proper hearing care.

For confirmation of the information provided above and any additional facts see:

http://list25.com/25-popular-myths-debunked/5/

www.betterhearing.org


We’ll be back in 5! – Gone to the Starkey Hearing Expo…

Chicagoland Hearing_Audibel_Starkey Hearing AidsNot really! Our doors are still open, but owners Benjamin Wright and Sarah Sommers are spending 5 days in Las Vegas for the premier event for independent hearing professionals. The Starkey Hearing Expo features industry experts and global thought leaders. We can’t wait until they get back to hear all about how Starkey Technologies is revolutionizing the hearing aid industry and bringing new technology to our patients. Chicagoland Hearing is proud to bring the power of Starkey Technology to our patients! Want to learn more about the event and how Starkey Technologies are redefining the industry and patient experience? Visit:

http://www.bloomberg.com/research/markets/news/article.asp?docKey=600 201601201307PRIMZONEFULLFEED10159369-1

http://www.starkey.com/


Hidden Hearing Loss?

hearing-loss_hidden-hearing-loss_hearing-aids-costco_costco-hearing-aids_hearing-aids-chicago_hearing-aids-niles_hearing-aids-wheaton_hearing-bloomingdaleHearing loss patient Jeff Larcomb could pass a standard hearing test just fine. But he still could not figure out what others said while in a noisy room.

“It’s impossible… As soon as there’s competing sound, it’s all mushed together,” Larcomb said.

“I’m staring really intently at people and trying to follow their mouth and stuff like that,” Larcomb continued. “It’s just not normal behavior, right, and people are kind of like, ‘What’s this guy’s deal?'”

The reason patients such as Larcomb struggled deciphering speech in noisy situations had been previously unexplained by audiologists.

New research has now named the condition hidden hearing loss.

“Hidden hearing loss… may very well explain a substantial number of these people who have trouble hearing in background noise,” audiologist James Hall said.

Researchers studied young adults who may have regularly overexposed their ears to loud sounds and found that hidden hearing loss was associated with a disorder deep in the auditory system.

The condition may also play a role in tinnitus, an experience where some hear ringing in their ears.

Though not yet an official diagnosis, hidden hearing loss proves a promising start for frustrated patients.

“I’m really excited about that because what I think it does is it gives credence to the fact that this patient population exists,” audiologist Gail Whitelaw said.

As the research is new, there is no targeted treatment or cure.

For now, audiologists said hearing aids can help in some cases, as can a greater personal awareness of the effect of background noise.

Call Chicagoland Hearing Aid Centers today to set up a free hearing evaluation.


Introducing A3i BTE 13!

Chicagoland Audibel Hearing Aid Centers in Niles Bloomingdale and Wheaton_made for iphone hearing aidWe are excited to introduce the new A3i™ BTE 13, our newest Made for iPhone® Hearing Aid. With the addition of the BTE 13 and our latest advances to our Made for iPhone Hearing Aids – the A3i family continues to break new ground leading the way in performance, personalization and connectivity.

Our benchmark operating system,BluWave® 4.0, is now at the heart of all A3i BTE 13 and RIC 13 products enabling us to continually optimize audibility, comfort and sound quality to deliver Audibel Superior Sound. A3i delivers what patients want:

  • A more natural listening experience through Binaural Spatial Mapping and Active Noise Control2
  • Superior audibility in noisy environments thanks to our multichannel adaptive solution to directionality, Active Directional Detection and Voice Detect
  • Distortion-free comfort in loud situations with ISO-Clear Compression
  • Make control adjustments a thing of the past with Auto Experience Manager

Audibel’s patient-preferred TruLink™ Hearing Control app has been updated to include even more features that enhance streaming and hearing in noise to helps our patients hear better, live better and have a healthier life. With Stream Boost, our patients can have an automatic setting that boosts any incoming media stream for enhanced audio performance, while Comfort Boost allows them to aggressively reduce noise to optimize sound quality in noisy environments.

A3i connects hearing and health to make life better!


The man who ate his hearing aids


Man eats hearing aid_chicagoland audibel hearing aid center in bloomingdale niles and wheaton ilWe recently stumbled across a news article about a man you accidentally ate his hearing aids thinking they were cashews. You can read the full story here. Though this is obviously an extreme case of failing vision, we thought we would use the incident to remind our patients that our Bloomingdale office is located within the Wohl Eye Center.

Studies have show that there is a direct correlation between vision and hearing loss in adults in older persons. This sensory decline can have a cumulative effect on well-being, quality of life and connection to family and friends. Call today to book your hearing and vision examinations!  See our full post on our eye and ear center in Bloomingdale here.